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Ballot Measures

Do voters ever get a direct say on questions related to a woman's right to choose? In many states, the answer is yes. Anti-choice groups often try to put measures on the ballot. If these measures qualify, they appear as questions that go directly before voters.

2014 Choice-Related Ballot Measures

Colorado Amendment 67
In 2014, Coloradans will once again vote on an anti-choice, "personhood"-like measure that would amend the state's constitution. If it passes, it could pave the way to a ban on abortion, even in cases of rape or incest, and outlaw common forms of birth control. The same groups that pushed the last two anti-choice ballot measures are behind this one, and even though Amendment 67 sounds well-intentioned, their goal to ban abortion hasn't changed. Check out NARAL Pro-Choice Colorado for more information and ways to take action.

Illinois Pro-Choice Birth Control Referendum
The Illinois legislature put a question on the November ballot regarding prescription birth-control coverage. While non-binding, the question would affirm that the majority of Illinois voters support requiring any health-insurance plan that covers prescription drugs to also cover prescription birth control. Check out the Illinois Choice Action Team for more information and vote "YES" on November 4!

North Dakota "Personhood" Measure
In November, North Dakotans will vote on a personhood amendment that would define life as beginning at conception. Should this measure pass, it would effectively ban abortion in almost all cases, outlaw some of the most common forms of birth control, restrict fertility treatments such as in-vitro fertilization, and forbid stem-cell research. While "personhood" proposals have appeared on the ballot in several states, they have all failed

Tennessee Anti-Choice Constitutional Amendment
Voters in Tennessee will vote on a measure that would repeal a woman’s right to privacy and significantly expand the power of elected officials in the state to restrict abortion rights. If the measure passes, the legislature would have the power to repeal any measure that protects abortion rights. That's not all. If Roe v. Wade were ever overturned, the Tennessee Supreme Court would have no authority to keep abortion legal in the state.


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